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March 20, 1943

RECURRENT INTRACRANIAL HEMORRHAGES IN A PATIENT WITH HEMOPHILIA

Author Affiliations

Philadelphia

From the Medical Service of Dr. Harold L. Goldburgh, Jewish Hospital.

JAMA. 1943;121(12):933-935. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.62840120003009a
Abstract

repair of cranial defects should be included in the surgical supplies of every general military hospital.

CONCLUSION  The method described of repairing a cranial defect involving a part of the face by the use of a tantalum implant has afforded protection to the intracranial structures approximating that offered by the normal cranium. The convalescence in my case was brief and the normal facial contour was restored.Surprisingly little has been added to our knowledge of the etiology and pathogenesis of hemophilia since it was first described as a distinct clinical entity by Otto in 1803. There is still some discussion concerning the essential clinical features of the condition. Most observers, however, agree that hemophilia is a blood dyscrasia occurring almost exclusively in males and transmitted according to mendelian laws of inheritance by the female. The disease is characterized by a history of repeated hemorrhages, a prolonged clotting time and a

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