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Article
July 18, 1931

REMOVAL OF TWO SEWING NEEDLES EMBEDDED IN THE FALCIFORM LIGAMENT AND RIGHT LOBE OF THE LIVER FOR FIFTEEN YEARS

JAMA. 1931;97(3):174. doi:10.1001/jama.1931.27310030001010
Abstract

M. K., a man, aged 52, was referred to me, March 16, 1931, with a diagnosis of gastric or duodenal ulcer of fifteen years' duration. The patient complained of alternating dull and sharp pains in the epigastrium, coming on about one hour after eating and relieved by the taking of sodium bicarbonate. Vomiting had been frequent with no relation to the type of food eaten. He stated that he used alcohol in moderation. The general impression was that of a morose individual, reluctant to give any information regarding his past life, emaciated and having a markedly anxious facies. Routine laboratory and roentgen examinations were ordered. A few hours after the patient was admitted to the Lutheran Memorial Hospital his pastor informed me that his parishioner had confessed to him that, fifteen years ago, he had pushed two sewing needles into his epigastrium in an attempt to commit suicide. A series

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