[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
August 1, 1931

PSYCHOCHEMISTRYSOME PHYSICOCHEMICAL FACTORS IN MENTAL DISORDERS CHAIRMAN'S ADDRESS

JAMA. 1931;97(5):293-296. doi:10.1001/jama.1931.02730050001001
Abstract

The application of another of the fundamental sciences to the study of behavior, namely biochemistry, is being witnessed today, and the designation psychochemistry is the natural result.

Advances in a science emanate from those who, already versed in two different disciplines, work in the field of knowledge lying between them. Mere collaboration of two different experts will not be so productive, since neither can be completely in sympathy with the point of view of the other. Few biochemists are versed in psychiatry, however, and few psychiatrists have more than a bowing acquaintance with such terms as colloidal dispersion, interfaces, ionic dissociation and oxidation-reduction. Psychochemists, therefore, will be grounded in biochemistry as well as in psychiatry and will investigate the problems of normal and abnormal behavior from the standpoint of altered chemical reactions in that master tissue of the body, the central nervous system. The failure of microscopy to demonstrate structural

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×