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Article
June 12, 1943

EXCRETION OF THIAMINE, RIBOFLAVIN, NIACIN AND PANTOTHENIC ACID IN HUMAN SWEAT

Author Affiliations

CHICAGO

From the Departments of Dermatology, Physiological Chemistry and Chemistry, University of Illinois College of Medicine and of Pharmacy.

JAMA. 1943;122(7):426-429. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840240016006
Abstract

The excretion of vitamins in sweat is of interest from the standpoint of the metabolism of such vitamins in the body and the possible loss of such vitamins by this channel, especially in instances of profuse sweating. Such results also have a bearing on the physiology of perspiration. The amount of sweat vitamins might also conceivably have a bearing on the growth of organisms on the skin, since some of these vitamins have a definite effect on the growth of certain micro-organisms.

One of us has reported on the excretion of ascorbic acid in sweat.1 An increased excretion of this vitamin was noted in sweat after administration of large doses of the vitamin. Hardt and Still2 studied the excretion of thiamine as well as of ascorbic acid in sweat after exercise. They concluded that 5 to 15 per cent of ingested thiamine might be the daily loss by

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