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Article
June 26, 1943

PERIPHERAL NEURITIS AS A COMPLICATION OF PERNICIOUS ANEMIAAND COMBINED SYSTEM DISEASE

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Department of Neuropsychiatry (Dr. Dynes) and the Department of Internal Medicine (Dr. Norcross), the Lahey Clinic.

JAMA. 1943;122(9):586-588. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840260014003
Abstract

The literature concerning pernicious anemia and its associated neurologic complications, both clinical and pathologic, is voluminous. We should like to call attention to certain clinical aspects which, although not entirely neglected in previous reports, have not, we feel, been emphasized sufficiently. The specialist is quite familiar with the various aspects of this problem and with the variability of the neurologic complications of pernicious anemia. This brief review is directed primarily, therefore, to the general practitioner who first sees and examines these patients and starts them on a course of treatment.

When one considers the neurologic disorders which may precede,1 accompany or follow the onset of pernicious anemia, one invariably thinks of subacute combined system disease. There can be little question that sclerosis and degeneration within the posterior and lateral columns of the spinal cord2 have been the most frequently observed pathologic findings. The most common clinical finding3

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