[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
February 16, 1929

SICKNESS IN RURAL NEW YORKMORBIDITY SURVEY OF CERTAIN DISTRICTS IN 1927

Author Affiliations

Director, Division of Vital Statistics, New York State Department of Health ALBANY, N. Y.

JAMA. 1929;92(7):522-528. doi:10.1001/jama.1929.02700330006003
Abstract

In most of the civilized countries of the world, mortality is slowly approaching an irreducible minimum. In the state of New York, for example, the death rate in 1927 was 12.3; in 1890 the rate was 21.4, the highest since 1885, when the vital statistics of the state were first compiled. Thus, in the course of thirty-seven years, the death rate dropped 43 per cent. Among the many factors responsible for this great improvement, organized public and private health activities occupy a prominent place. But will the continued and extended application of these efforts produce similar results in the course of the next two score of years? The answer is clearly and emphatically no. A reduction of 43 per cent in the present death rate would mean that only seven out of a thousand persons would die in the course of a year, and this cannot be hoped for. While

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×