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Article
October 16, 1943

AUTOPSY NERVE GRAFTS IN PERIPHERAL NERVE SURGERYCLINICAL APPLICATION; "GLUE" SUTURE TECHNIC

Author Affiliations

ST. LOUIS; MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES; Instructor in Surgery, St. Louis University School of Medicine ST. LOUIS

From the Neurosurgical Service of Roland M. Klemme, M.D., professor of surgery, chairman of the Division of Neurosurgery, St. Louis University School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1943;123(7):393-396. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840420005003
Abstract

Repair of peripheral nerves with preserved cadaver grafts has become one of the most promising fields of modern surgery. The results of animal experimentation and clinical application appear to justify this claim. This communication is a preliminary report dealing with the clinical application of experimental work of one of us1 to 3 cases in which preserved cadaver grafts have been used to repair large defects in human peripheral nerves.

To appreciate the failures of peripheral nerve surgery in the past, the pathologic anatomy of the traumatized nerve must be considered. When a nerve is severed there is considerable hemorrhage into the injured area. In the process of repair this hemorrhage is replaced by scar tissue and neuroma formation even when directly sutured. The consensus is that neuromas are largely due to the outgrowth of the proximal end of the neurons trying to find their way down the distal portion

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