[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
October 16, 1943

CONTACT DERMATITIS CAUSED BY HAIR LACQUER PADSA CHARACTERISTIC CLINICAL PICTURE

Author Affiliations

Marshfield, Wis.

From the Marshfield Clinic.

JAMA. 1943;123(7):409. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.82840420002008a

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

The "up-do" hair style has made it necessary to make more extensive use of lacquers than heretofore to keep the hair and locks in the desired position.

During the past few months, hair lacquer pads have been introduced. They consist of powder puffs which are soaked with some form of lacquer. Beauty parlor operators and patients tell me that the lacquer of these pads is more "gluey" than the older fluids, which were usually sprayed, on with an atomizer. For home use the pads provide a convenient means of application and are becoming more popular.

Recently I have seen several instances of contact dermatitis from this source. These cases presented a characteristic clinical picture. As there are—as far as I know—no reports of this form of dermatitis, it seems justifiable to call attention to its etiologic factor.

REPORT OF CASE  Mrs. T. H. and her two daughters, 4 and 6

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×