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Article
March 2, 1929

ANATOMIC VARIATIONS AND ANOMALIES OF THE SPINERELATION TO PROGNOSIS AND LENGTH OF DISABILITY

JAMA. 1929;92(9):698-701. doi:10.1001/jama.1929.02700350006005
Abstract

Nearly every patient who has had any kind of an accident, even remote, and who discovers any sort of pain in the back, no matter where and when, almost invariably attributes this backache or pain to the accident. Ordinarily he is not willing to believe that any abnormality of the back can be brought about by anything other than traumatism, and he can usually trace the origin of this trouble—accurately to his own satisfaction—to some strain or blow.

The occurrence of injured backs is of much interest to all surgeons, as well as to all roentgenologists. This is true also of railway chief surgeons. The railway spine of Erickson, which made its meteoric appearance before the medical profession and in the courts years ago, has now insinuated itself among a larger group of people, including the medical fraternity, as the so-called industrial spine. Anomalies and anatomic variations in the symptomless

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