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October 30, 1943

BALANTIDIUM COLIREPORT OF CASE WITH PROCTOSCOPIC STUDY

Author Affiliations

Omaha

From the Department of Surgery (Proctology) and the Department of Bacteriology, Creighton University School of Medicine, Omaha.

JAMA. 1943;123(9):549-550. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.82840440003007a
Abstract

Balantidium coli is an intestinal parasite of pigs and human beings; however, infections by this ciliate in man are comparatively rare, as is indicated by the cases reported.1 The organisms have been found also in the intestinal tracts of orangutans and monkeys.2 Awakian3 found a balantidium in wild rats in Moscow, Russia. It seems therefore reasonable to assume that this parasite is a potential hazard because of its universal distribution and its numerous hosts.

In spite of the fact that the possibility for infection is great, the opportunity for proctosigmoidoscopic study of cases is not frequent because they are not readily recognized. The following case was extremely interesting to us:

M. H., a white man aged 33, a farmer, poorly developed, entered the Creighton Clinic on Jan. 7, 1941 complaining of periodic attacks of diarrhea of seventeen years' duration. The onset occurred in 1924, while he was

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