[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.161.128.52. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
March 9, 1929

TRICHINOSISREPORT OF TWO CASES PRESENTING DIPLOPIA AND ONE, POLYSEROSITIS

Author Affiliations

HARTFORD, CONN.

From the Medical Service and the Hall-Wilson Laboratory of the Hartford Hospital.

JAMA. 1929;92(10):791-793. doi:10.1001/jama.1929.02700360029008
Abstract

It is not surprising that trichinosis is incorrectly diagnosed when first seen in the majority of instances because it so closely simulates other much more common diseases. The mistake is particularly apt to occur in patients who develop the disease during the winter months when so-called grip is prevalent. The muscle pains, fever, profuse perspiration and prostration are very similar in the two diseases and, when headache is severe, an infection of the sinuses is often thought to be present. The edema about the eyes is sometimes erroneously attributed to the same cause. The presenting symptoms vary greatly. "Heaviness in the stomach," eructations, loss of appetite, nausea, sometimes associated with vomiting and at times accompanied by colic, especially nocturnal, and frequently diarrhea focus attention on the gastro-intestinal tract. Two of the patients admitted to the Hartford Hospital during recent years gave diarrhea as the outstanding complaint.

During the first week

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×