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Article
November 6, 1943

THE CONTROL OF AN OUTBREAK OF BACILLARY DYSENTERY WITH SULFONAMIDES

Author Affiliations

Attending Pediatrician, Lebanon Hospital; Medical Director, Israel Orphan Asylum; Assistant Medical Director, Israel Orphan Asylum NEW YORK

From the Israel Orphan Asylum, New York City.

JAMA. 1943;123(10):624-626. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.02840450026006
Abstract

Bacillary dysentery continues to be a problem in crowded institutions, army camps and orphanages. The difficulty of control has been pointed out by many authors.1 In former years treatment of the cases was purely symptomatic and control of the infection could be obtained only by isolation and quarantine or by permitting the outbreak to run its course after it had attacked a large percentage of the susceptible. Since the introduction of the sulfonamides, favorable reports of treatment of cases of bacillary dysentery with these drugs have appeared in the literature.2 Of late the less soluble drugs, particularly sulfaguanidine and succinylsulfathiazole, have had a considerable vogue. Theoretically there should be an advantage in the use of these drugs, since the concentration of the drug in the intestinal tract is higher than with the more readily absorbable ones.

OUTBREAK  We had an opportunity recently to test the value of

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