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Article
November 6, 1943

COLD AUTOHEMAGGLUTININS FOLLOWING ATYPICAL PNEUMONIA PRODUCING THE CLINICAL PICTURE OF ACROCYANOSIS

Author Affiliations

Medical Corps, Army of the United States; Medical Corps, Army of the United States

From the Laboratory and Medical Services, Station Hospital, U. S. Army Air Base, Lincoln, Neb.

JAMA. 1943;123(10):626-628. doi:10.1001/jama.1943.82840450001007
Abstract

The phenomenon of autoagglutination and autohemolysis has often been described in paroxysmal hemoglobinuria, which is sometimes encountered in congenital syphilis. In 1937 McCombs and McElroy1 in a review of the available literature reported that autoagglutination had been observed in hemolytic icterus, trypanosomiasis,2 severe anemias and liver disease, occasionally in pneumonia and also in apparently normal persons. It has likewise been reported in cases of hemolytic anemia associated with sulfanilamide therapy3 and acute hemolytic anemia due to lead poisoning.4 Wiener5 in his recently revised book on "Blood Groups and Transfusions" expressed the thought that the phenomenon must not be too rare because he himself had observed at least a dozen instances of autoagglutination occurring at room temperature.

In February 1943 Peterson, Ham and Finland6 reported finding a high incidence of cold agglutinins (autohemagglutinins) which appeared at low temperatures in the blood serum of patients with

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