[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 50.16.107.222. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
April 27, 1929

THE RELATIONSHIP OF MEDICAL EDUCATION TO THE COST OF MEDICAL CARE

Author Affiliations

WASHINGTON, D. C.

JAMA. 1929;92(17):1410-1412. doi:10.1001/jama.1929.02700430012004
Abstract

The medical profession of America has made medical education one of its chief interests during the past quarter of a century. In the twenty-five years ahead, it is inevitable that the adequate and economical distribution of medical service to all elements of the population, on some basis yet to be determined, will be the outstanding subject of attention.

The injection of the laboratory into the medical school and hospital revamped our conceptions of medical education. The discoveries and inventions in the laboratories and factories and their practical application to daily life have built a new civilization which has remade the conditions surrounding all medical practice. There has been a marked change in the content of the medical course, in the methods of teaching, in the function of hospitals and in the daily life of the physician, but no change in the effects of disease organisms on the human body or

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×