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May 11, 1929

INFESTATION WITH DIPHYLLOBOTHRIUM LATUM, FISH TAPEWORMWITH ESPECIAL REFERENCE TO NATIVE CASES

Author Affiliations

MINNEAPOLIS

JAMA. 1929;92(19):1587-1593. doi:10.1001/jama.1929.02700450019009
Abstract

Native infestation with Diphyllobothrium latum, formerly a rare condition practically unknown before 1906, is now becoming increasingly more common. The first reference to such a case by Nickerson1 in 1906 was followed by additional reports of about one case every four or five years, and since 1920 there has been a rapid increase in the number of cases reported and in the frequency of their occurrence (table 1).

My first interest in this subject dates back to 1916, when a Finnish mother brought her 7 year old boy (case 4), born and raised in Minnesota, for examination. She showed me a jar containing many yards of adult segments of tapeworm just passed by the boy. The specimen was easily identified as Diphyllobothrium latum. This case was later reported by Riley,2 chief of the division of economic zoology at the University of Minnesota department of agriculture. Since then I

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