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Article
July 6, 1929

THE EFFECTS ON HUMAN BEINGS OF A TWELVE MONTHS' EXCLUSIVE MEAT DIETBASED ON INTENSIVE CLINICAL AND LABORATORY STUDIES ON TWO ARCTIC EXPLORERS LIVING UNDER AVERAGE CONDITIONS IN A NEW YORK CLIMATE

JAMA. 1929;93(1):20-22. doi:10.1001/jama.1929.02710010026005
Abstract

The question of minimal and optimal protein requirements has received considerable research attention in recent years. There is now very little disagreement among students of nutrition as to what these requirements are. On the effects of a high protein dietary, however, not only do opinions of authorities differ but the results of carefully controlled experiments show considerable variance. It is a traditional belief that a high protein intake leads to high blood pressure, arteriosclerosis or nephritis. Among physicians it has almost become a dietetic dogma to reduce or eliminate entirely the intake of meat whenever diets are prescribed. Unless proper interpretation is given to certain present-day investigations on protein metabolism, including the results of the experiment reviewed in this paper, there is danger that the dietetic pendulum will swing too far in the opposite direction.

The Eskimos have lived on a high protein dietary as far back as records go.

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