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Article
June 3, 1944

Current Comment

JAMA. 1944;125(5):358-359. doi:10.1001/jama.1944.02850230038015
Abstract

SEEING-EYE DOGS AND ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT FOR THE BLIND  In this issue of The Journal (page 321) appears an article by Brig. Gen. Charles C. Hillman of the United States Army medical department calling attention to the rehabilitation of the blind and the deafened. Some months ago The Journal noted that the total blinded in the first world war had been well under 500 for both Great Britain and the United States. In the present war, according to the statement by General Hillman, there were only 73 totally blinded in the Army to March 1, 1944. It will be observed from General Hillman's report that it is estimated that not more than 10 per cent of the blind would benefit by the use of a so-called seeing-eye dog. Nevertheless, on May 25 the President signed a bill which had been passed by the House and the Senate

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