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Article
August 5, 1944

THE SIGNIFICANCE OF THE FEBRILE REACTION IN INFLUENZA

Author Affiliations

WINSTON-SALEM, N. C.

From the Department of Medicine, Bowman Gray School of Medicine of Wake Forest College, and the North Carolina Baptist Hospital.

JAMA. 1944;125(14):948. doi:10.1001/jama.1944.02850320006002
Abstract

Some years ago one of us1 in a paper on influenza said "One very firm impression I have formed, though I have no statistics to confirm it, is that the higher the initial temperature, the more quickly it is apt to subside."

This impression crystallized gradually as a result of repeated epidemics following the great pandemic of 1918-1919 and was emphasized by the experience of 1 patient in particular. This woman, a nurse, had an attack of influenza every January for five or six consecutive years. Every attack except one began insidiously and the temperature rarely exceeded 100 F., more often remaining under 99 F. Her stay in the hospital varied from twelve to fifty-six days, and an additional month was usually needed to make her fit for duty. Finally she had an attack which began with a sudden onset and a temperature of 102.6 F. The fever lasted

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