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Article
September 14, 1929

HUMAN OVA FROM THE UTERINE TUBES

Author Affiliations

DETROIT; COLUMBIA, MO.; ST. LOUIS; COLUMBIA, MO.

From the Department of Surgery, Gynecology and Obstetrics, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit; the Department of Anatomy, University of Missouri, School of Medicine, Columbia, and the Department of Gynecology of the Surgical Service, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis.

JAMA. 1929;93(11):834-837. doi:10.1001/jama.1929.02710110020005
Abstract

Until recently the human ovum has escaped recognition and certain identification during the interval that begins with the rupture of a graafian follicle and ends with implantation of a fertilized ovum in the uterus. Several factors have been responsible for this, not the least of which is the small size of the object sought. Study of ova in the uterine tubes of mammals, especially in primates, i. e., in monkeys (Corner1 and Allen2), suggested the desirability of a similar search in the uterine tubes of women. For the purpose of this study, a cooperative group was formed to observe such suitable material as could be found at operation. As a result of this investigation, several specimens were recovered from human tubes. A preliminary report of the part of this investigation that deals with some of the specimens examined immediately after recovery has been published.3 A further detailed

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