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Article
September 2, 1944

COMPRESSION OF SEVENTH CERVICAL NERVE ROOT BY HERNIATION OF AN INTERVERTEBRAL DISK

Author Affiliations

Chicago

From the Department of Neurology and Neurological Surgery and the Illinois Neuropsychiatric Institute, University of Illinois College of Medicine.

JAMA. 1944;126(1):26-27. doi:10.1001/jama.1944.82850360001008
Abstract

Several cases of herniation of a cervical intervertebral disk have been recorded in the literature, but nearly all of these have been instances in which compression of the spinal cord itself by a midline herniation predominated.1 Semmes and Murphy2 mention 4 cases from the literature which presented symptoms of compression of a cervical nerve root without involvement of the spinal cord and present 4 similar cases of their own. Three of the latter cases of unilateral herniation of a cervical intervertebral disk were verified by operation. The syndrome of compression of the seventh cervical nerve root as shown in the latter 4 cases was remarkably constant and occurred on the left side in all 4. All these patients gave a history of numerous "cricks" in the neck for months or years preceding the severe attack. Two gave a definite history of trauma to, or motion of, the neck

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