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Article
September 2, 1944

THE INTERNATIONAL LABOR ORGANIZATION ON SICKNESS INSURANCE

JAMA. 1944;126(1):32-33. doi:10.1001/jama.1944.02850360034013
Abstract

Possibly the action of the International Labor Organization at its twenty-sixth conference in Philadelphia during April and May of the present year may have a greater influence on sickness insurance legislation than any of the laws proposed in Congress.1 Delegates from forty-one nations composed this conference, including nearly all Allied and neutral nations except the Soviet Union. There are four representatives from each nation. Two of these are appointed by the government, and one is chosen by employer and the other by labor organizations.

The recommendations for sickness insurance are more elaborate than those of any previous conference. They constitute a complete outline for legislation; if previous experience points to future possibilities, these recommendations are likely to be followed in legislation introduced in nearly all the countries not having sickness insurance at the present time. Some of the features in the recommended legislation especially suggested are as follows:

The

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