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Article
September 9, 1944

SOME HARMFUL EFFECTS OF RECUMBENCY IN THE TREATMENT OF HEART DISEASE

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Medical Clinic of the Peter Bent Brigham Hospital and the Department of Medicine, Harvard Medical School.

JAMA. 1944;126(2):80-84. doi:10.1001/jama.1944.02850370018004
Abstract

Rest of the affected part is a fundamental form of treatment in many diseases. When a bone is fractured, splints are applied and the involved parts are immobilized. This not only diminishes pain but speeds repair and healing. When a lung is actively affected with tuberculosis, attempts are made to diminish the movements of the diseased lung. The phrenic nerve may be sectioned, pneumothorax produced or thoracoplasty performed, the purpose of these procedures being to rest the affected organ. In a similar way when the heart is diseased, rest in bed has been urged as a means of diminishing its work. Not so long ago the relative value of rest and exercise was much debated and was summarized by Pratt,1 who strongly advocated prolonged rest in bed for heart failure. At present all students and physicians have been forcefully impressed with the great importance of rest in bed, although

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