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October 21, 1944

FIBRIN FOAM AS A HEMOSTATIC AGENT IN REHABILITATION NEUROSURGERY

Author Affiliations

MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES

From the Neurosurgical Section of the Walter Reed General Hospital, Washington, D. C.

JAMA. 1944;126(8):469-471. doi:10.1001/jama.1944.02850430003002
Abstract

The introduction by Ingraham and Bailey1 of fibrin foam2 as a hemostatic agent in neurologic surgery marks a technical advance as significant as the earlier introductions of the silver clip and the electrocautery. The control of hemorrhage from small or moderate sized vessels in the brain or spinal neuroaxis by electrocoagulation or clipping is relatively standardized and has been proved satisfactory. The control of capillary bleeding from the substance of the brain or spinal cord, from small vessels over the surface of the medulla or spinal cord or from the vascular supply of peripheral nerves cannot be accomplished by these destructive measures. Nor is it feasible to control gross hemorrhage from tumor beds or lacerated venous sinuses by these technics. For these purposes, cotton patties soaked in warm saline solution or muscle stamps have been used. As Ingraham has pointed out, everyday experience has indicated that these methods

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