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Article
November 9, 1929

PUERPERAL MORBIDITY AND MORTALITYWITH ESPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE EFFECTS OF PREVIOUS INFECTION AND OPERATIVE DELIVERY

Author Affiliations

Assisted By Chester Clark, M.D. BROOKLYN

JAMA. 1929;93(19):1436-1440. doi:10.1001/jama.1929.02710190008002
Abstract

If statistical studies throw any light on maternal mortality, it is certain that:

  1. Six or seven women out of every thousand confined die from causes directly or indirectly related to pregnancy, labor and the puerperium.

  2. There has been no improvement in maternal mortality records in the United States during the past ten years. In 1915 the maternal mortality rate in the registration area was 6.1, in 1920, 8, and in 1927, 6.7 per thousand births. Such statistics in the face of the advances made in prenatal study and supervision suggest that women are not receiving clean or scientific intrapartal care and that something is wrong with the teaching and training given to the undergraduate.

  3. More than 40 per cent, or two fifths, of all maternal deaths are due to infection, supposedly a preventable cause, while 27 per cent are chargeable to the toxemias and eclampsia, also preventable conditions. Of the

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