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December 9, 1944

THE ROENTGEN DIAGNOSIS OF TRAUMATIC LESIONS OF THE CERVICAL SPINE

Author Affiliations

Assistant Chief of X-Ray Section, Percy Jones General Hospital, Battle Creek, Mich. MEDICAL CORPS, ARMY OF THE UNITED STATES

JAMA. 1944;126(15):950-954. doi:10.1001/jama.1944.02850500022006
Abstract

Twenty-five hundred years B. C. a certain author stated that "one having a crushed vertebra in his neck, he is unconscious of his two arms and his two legs and he is speechless." Thus, according to Stinchfield,1 began the history of fractures of the spine. As recently as 1917 an eminent radiologist said "On account of the technical difficulties in making plates laterally, most of us have been content to make stereoscopic plates in the anteroposterior projection."2 Present day technic of cervical spine radiography is not difficult, if done with care.

In Percy Jones General Hospital we have been fortunate in having one of the newer developments in technical equipment—the Morgan meter.3 This is valuable in making both simple and difficult projections of the spine. The operation of the meter depends on the fact that intensity × exposure time × a constant. Thus, if the intensity reaching

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