[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.211.62.139. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other Articles
December 23, 1944

ROLE OF INDUSTRIAL MEDICINE IN THE REHABILITATION OF VETERANS

Author Affiliations

Medical Director, Eastern Aircraft-Trenton Division, General Motors Corporation, Trenton, New Jersey; Employment Interviewer, Eastern Aircraft-Trenton Division, General Motors Corporation, Trenton, New Jersey TRENTON, N. J.

JAMA. 1944;126(17):1073-1077. doi:10.1001/jama.1944.02850520015007
Abstract

The significance of my remarks will be confined to what they actually are; namely, the personal observations of a physician in an industry which is aware of its responsibility to some of these veterans. Table 1 lists the group studied.

One cannot talk about generalities and with these generalities settle any one particular case. The actual disposition and training of "G. I. Joe" is an individual problem, requiring individual evaluation and individual disposition; it may be incorrect to apply to any 1 case the general opinions gained from studying the group of veterans which we have handled so far. This necessarily individual evaluation is no more true of "G. I. Joe" than it is of John Doe or Mary Doe, the ordinary civilian.

I should like to classify veterans as (1) those who have or have not been former employees and (2) those who have or have not service connected

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×