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December 23, 1944

THE USE OF THEOPHYLLINE ETHYLENEDIAMINE (AMINOPHYLLINE) FOR THE RELIEF OF BILIARY COLIC: A PRELIMINARY REPORT

Author Affiliations

Burlington, Vt.

From the Departments of Surgery and Pharmacology, University of Vermont College of Medicine.

JAMA. 1944;126(17):1084-1085. doi:10.1001/jama.1944.82850520001010
Abstract

Our purpose in this communication is to call attention to the use of theophylline ethylenediamine for the relief of biliary colic. For many years it has been known that the xanthines are capable of relaxing certain smooth muscles. Thus, theophylline has been employed for symptomatic relief of patients with angina pectoris and bronchial asthma.1 The antispasmodic action of theophylline, however, is not manifested to any great extent on the gastrointestinal tract. Nevertheless, it has been shown by Butsch, McGowan and Walters2 that theophylline ethylenediamine is effective in overcoming spasm of the biliary tract produced in man by the injection of morphine, dihydromorphinone hydrochloride (dilaudid) or codeine. It is well known that the phenanthrene alkaloids of opium produce spasm of smooth muscles of hollow viscera. Morphine relieves pain due to such spasm only by virtue of its analgesic action on the central nervous system. Locally, the mechanism for the

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