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April 21, 1945

THE POSSIBLE ROLE OF WHOLE BLOOD TRANSFUSIONS IN MILITARY MEDICINE

Author Affiliations

IOWA CITY

From the Department of Internal Medicine, State University of Iowa College of Medicine.

JAMA. 1945;127(16):1037-1039. doi:10.1001/jama.1945.02860160013004
Abstract

There has been a steady increase in the use of transfusions of whole blood in civilian medicine since the introduction of sodium citrate as an anticoagulant in 1914. The procedure has become commonplace in most well equipped hospitals in the United States. The development of blood banks has still further stimulated this practice by rendering blood readily available in emergencies and by making the operation more convenient than has hitherto been possible. From this extensive clinical experience certain observations have been abundantly confirmed. Patients with chronic anemia from almost any cause improve subjectively and objectively after transfusion. They withstand major surgical procedures better when the anemia has been previously corrected by the administration of blood. Some types of infections are better combated with the aid of blood from healthy persons. But the most spectacular result is seen in shock from severe hemorrhage. Here the transfusion of blood is frequently life

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