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November 14, 1936

THE USE OF DRUGS IN THE TREATMENT OF ANEMIA

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Thorndike Memorial Laboratory, Second and Fourth Medical Services (Harvard), Boston City Hospital, and the Departments of Medicine and Tropical Medicine, Harvard Medical School.

JAMA. 1936;107(20):1633-1636. doi:10.1001/jama.1936.92770460002011
Abstract

This is one of a series of articles written by eminent clinicians for the purpose of extending information concerning the official medicines. The twenty-four articles in this series have been planned and developed through the cooperation of the U. S. Pharmacopeial Committee of Revision andThe Journal of the American Medical Association.—Ed.

The past two decades have witnessed radical changes in the management of anemia. Previously treatment for all types of anemia consisted chiefly in general hygienic measures, fresh air, nutritious food, iron and arsenic to "stimulate" the bone marrow, and transfusion of blood when necessary. Today diagnosis of the specific type of anemia is of primary importance. It is recognized that anemia occurs either because of loss or increased destruction of blood, or because of decreased formation of blood. If anemia results either from acute loss or from increased destruction of blood, drug or diet

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