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January 16, 1937

SENSITIZATION TO MILK AS A RESULT OF ITS USE IN NONSPECIFIC FOREIGN PROTEIN THERAPY

Author Affiliations

From the Department of Medicine, Sections of Allergy and Dermatology, the University of Chicago.

JAMA. 1937;108(3):193-194. doi:10.1001/jama.1937.02780030031007
Abstract

The increasing use of nonspecific foreign protein therapy, especially milk and its derivatives, prompts the report of an instance of untoward reaction to its administration and a few brief experimental observations on two such preparations.

REPORT OF CASE 

History.—  J. B., a German housewife, aged 24, entered the clinic complaining of asthma of two years' duration. There was no previous history of asthma in Germany or in Chicago until two years before admission, two years after her arrival in Chicago. There was, however, a typical history of seasonal hay fever of the fall type. The family history and past history were negative except for frequent colds and the loss of 35 pounds (16 Kg.) in two years.

Examination.—  The patient was rather markedly under-nourished. She breathed with difficulty and with an audible expiratory wheeze. There was mild cyanosis. The chest moved symmetrically, with considerable use of the accessory muscles of

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