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February 6, 1937

AN APPROACH TO THE PROBLEM OF SCHOOL MEDICAL AND DENTAL SERVICE

Author Affiliations

Medical Adviser and Professor of Hygiene, Cornell University ITHACA, N. Y.

JAMA. 1937;108(6):435-439. doi:10.1001/jama.1937.02780060001001
Abstract

Late statistics show that in the United States there are now in operation 245,941 public schools housing 26,849,639 pupils. In these public schools $8,000,000,000 has been invested, and to maintain this property and support the 1,055,825 teachers and other school personnel an additional $2,000,000,000 is expended each year. Adding the private and parochial school registration figures to the public school figures gives a total of 32,031,549 children attending schools of elementary and secondary level.

In view of the fact that society has at considerable expense thus grouped our 32 million children for purposes of instruction, the question quite naturally arises To what extent are we utilizing the school grouping of these children to improve their health and their hygiene?

To answer this question, one would naturally look first to the legal requirements set up in the various states regarding (1) school medical supervision, (2) health instruction and (3) physical education.

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