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February 20, 1937

A QUANTITATIVE STUDY OF THE FRIEDMAN TEST FOR PREGNANCY

Author Affiliations

AUGUSTA, GA.

From the Department of Anatomy and the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Georgia School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1937;108(8):615-617. doi:10.1001/jama.1937.02780080009003
Abstract

What constitutes a positive reaction of the ovaries of the rabbit in the Friedman1 modification of the Aschheim-Zondek test for pregnancy? Of what age and weight must the test animals be? What effect does the specific gravity and the reaction of the urine have on the outcome of the test? May the ovaries be examined always by the naked eye with the assurance of correct interpretation? Which is superior in accuracy, the original or the modified Friedman technic? How much blood serum must be used instead of urine when indicated and how accurate is the result? These and other questions occur to those using this important diagnostic procedure and, while numerous articles have been published about the Friedman test, the answers are not all available from one source.

In this study between 175 and 200 doe rabbits were employed. A few of these died before routine ether extraction of

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