[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other Articles
February 20, 1937

HYPERTHYROIDISM MASKED BY SYMPTOMS OF ACUTE ABDOMINAL CATASTROPHE

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

From the Medical Service of the Philadelphia General Hospital and Department of Medicine, Temple University School of Medicine.

JAMA. 1937;108(8):623-626. doi:10.1001/jama.1937.02780080017006
Abstract

Cases of acute abdominal pain occurring during the course of thyrotoxicosis have been reported in the continental literature by Stern,1 Kraus2 and Desbouis.3 The American literature contains scant reference to it. Horsley and Rosebro4 reported a case of hyperthyroidism in which the chief complaints on admission to the hospital were indigestion, pain in the abdomen and bearing down in the pelvis. Operation revealed, however, a chronic adherent appendicitis and pathologic condition of the pelvis. Lahey5 states that he has never seen a condition similar to the one dealt with in this presentation.

The practicing physician is well aware that abdominal pain suggestive of acute abdominal disease may merely express pain impulses from disease of the thoracic viscera. The "ruptured gastric ulcer and acute appendicitis" have not infrequently turned out to be a frank pneumonia, to the chagrin of the surgeon and the internist. The nausea,

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×