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September 8, 1945

VESICULOPUSTULAR ECZEMA

Author Affiliations

A. U. S. Med. Det., 129th Infantry, APO 37, P. M., San Francisco, California.

JAMA. 1945;129(2):150. doi:10.1001/jama.1945.02860360052024

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Abstract

To the Editor:—  Probably two thirds of the patients seen on dispensary service in the field are suffering from some type of skin disease. It is important to recognize and treat these cases early, for secondary infection occurs readily in the tropics as a result of the humidity and lack of bathing facilities noted among the front line outfits.During the past two years I have had the opportunity to observe a considerable number of cases of vesiculopustular eczema. There is no conclusive evidence that micro-organisms act as a primary cause, but they frequently aggravate the condition as secondary invaders. The lesions usually present themselves as small maculopapular eruptions, located usually in the axillary regions, the thorax and the anterior and anterolateral abdominal walls. These lesions cause mild pruritus associated with a "burning sensation" when the lesions are found in the axillas. After several days the small macular areas become

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