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September 15, 1945

VENTILATION IN THE SPREAD OF CHICKENPOX AND MEASLES WITHIN SCHOOL ROOMS

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA

From the Laboratories for the Study of Air-Borne Infection, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Philadelphia. These laboratories are supported by a grant from the Commonwealth Fund to the University of Pennsylvania for studies on the mechanics and control of air-borne infection.

JAMA. 1945;129(3):197-200. doi:10.1001/jama.1945.02860370019006
Abstract

School ventilation, which has necessarily been curtailed on account of fuel shortages during the war, will probably never return to prewar standards. Enlightened opinion, which formerly opposed, on hygienic grounds, lowering the volume of air change, now recognizes the potentiality of higher standards of sanitary ventilation through air disinfection, which can practicably provide the hygienic equivalent of ventilation impossible of attainment by actual air replacement.

Studies, begun in the autumn of 1937, were undertaken to test the hypothesis that the spread of air-borne infection in school rooms could be controlled by radiant disinfection of air. If micro-organisms are air borne, it follows that in a group of persons sharing a confined atmosphere for a given period of time the chance that an infective organism floating in the air will be breathed by a person susceptible to that particular disease is proportionate to the concentration of susceptibles in the atmosphere, just

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