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July 3, 1937

THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION AND THE CARE OF THE INDIGENT SICK

JAMA. 1937;109(1):32-33. doi:10.1001/jama.1937.02780270034012

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Abstract

In the welter of words that poured from Atlantic City, reporting the actions of the House of Delegates to the American people, some may find difficulty in ascertaining exactly what was decided with regard to the policies of the Association on the provision of medical care. The medical profession has never failed in its ideal of medical care for all—rich and poor alike— regardless of their ability to pay. At the Cleveland session the House of Delegates adopted ten principles that should prevail in medical practice. Those principles have not been changed. The ideals of mutual responsibility between doctor and patient, unalterable opposition to commercialized, bureaucratic or state practice, and willingness to do our utmost in providing all that can be provided to the sick still remain among the accepted principles of American medicine.

Some significant incidents in the period between the annual session of 1936 and the one this

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