[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.197.142.219. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other Articles
July 17, 1937

DENTAL LESIONS AND SYSTEMIC DISEASE

JAMA. 1937;109(3):211. doi:10.1001/jama.1937.02780290033012
Abstract

A connection between oral and systemic disorders has been frequently noted. Acute and chronic poisoning by fluorine leaves indelible records on the teeth. The so-called blue line due to poisoning by lead, bismuth, mercury and other metals is well known. vincent's infection associated with granulocytopenia is commonly observed. Subacute scurvy can sometimes be identified through a careful oral examination alone. Other examples may be easily added from general experience. Hence it is important to recognize the character and incidence of correlative symptoms if they are to be of diagnostic value.

It has been suggested but never adequately proved that tuberculous individuals are more susceptible to lesions of the soft and hard structures of the mouth than the healthy. An intensive investigation of the possible significant oral signs of tuberculosis has been reported from the Montefiore Hospital.1

Fifteen hundred patients in all stages of tuberculosis were studied to determine whether

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×