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August 7, 1937

BENIGN LYMPHOCYTIC CHORIOMENINGITISLABORATORY STUDIES WITH THE VIRUS AND THEIR POSSIBLE BEARING ON THE INFECTION IN MAN

Author Affiliations

Senior Surgeon and Bacteriologist, Respectively, United States Public Health Service WASHINGTON, D. C.

JAMA. 1937;109(6):410-412. doi:10.1001/jama.1937.02780320012004
Abstract

The virus of benign lymphocytic choriomeningitis was first isolated and described by workers at the National Institute of Health in 1934.1 Traub2 at Princeton in 1935 and Lépine and Sautter3 at Paris in 1936 recovered similar strains of virus from white mice, and Rivers and Scott4 at New York in 1935 and also Findlay, Alcock and Stern5 at London in 1936 isolated strains from human beings with nervous manifestations.

These various strains affected animals in a similar manner and have been shown to be immunologically similar to the original strain isolated by Armstrong.1 The virus is pathogenic for monkeys, guinea-pigs, mice and white rats and is capable of affecting many tissues and organs. For instance, Armstrong, Wooley and Onstott6 demonstrated an abundance of the virus in the brain, lungs, kidneys, heart muscle, voluntary muscles, marrow, salivary glands, adrenals, spleen, liver, testicles and blood

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