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September 18, 1937

RIGHT COLECTOMY FOR MALIGNANT DISEASEA DISCUSSION OF THE MORTALITY ASSOCIATED WITH VARIOUS OPERATIVE PROCEDURES

Author Affiliations

BOSTON

From the Surgical Department of the Massachusetts General Hospital.

JAMA. 1937;109(12):923-928. doi:10.1001/jama.1937.02780380007003
Abstract

Right colectomy is technically an easy procedure. After the practically bloodless lateral peritoneal attachment is freed, the bowel, with an almost transparent mesentery, delivers mesially in such a fashion as to make its removal a simple matter. The gland-bearing area can safely be included in the dissection, the terminal ileum and transverse colon being left adequately supplied with blood vessels at convenient levels for suitable anastomosis. The slow development of cancer in the right colon, with its tendency to remain localized, makes that location a particularly favorable site for cure.1 In spite of these facts, statistics show that, in the Massachusetts General Hospital, at least, the operative mortality is slightly higher for right colectomy for cancer than for extirpation of similar lesions in the left bowel. It seems reasonable to feel that greater consideration should be given the right colon, where the disease is less frequent and in connection

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