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October 2, 1937

Evaluation of the Industrial Hygiene Problems of a State

JAMA. 1937;109(14):1150. doi:10.1001/jama.1937.02780400066037

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A somewhat detailed study of one fifth of the gainful workers in the state of Maryland shows that nearly all these workers were "exposed" to some sort of harmful material. There is no very clear definition of exposure. "With reference to medical facilities, this survey revealed that 31 per cent of the employees had the services of a full time medical practitioner and 42 per cent a part time physician. A first aid room was available to 56 per cent of the employees, while trained first aid workers were available to 65 per cent of the workers. There was practically no part time nursing service, but, on the other hand, 40 per cent of the workers were provided with full time nurses. The information on disability statistics showed that nearly half of the workers were members of sick benefit associations, while sickness records were kept for approximately 55 per cent

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