[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.197.142.219. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Other Articles
October 16, 1937

THE USE OF CALCIUM AND THE CHOICE OF A CALCIUM SALT

JAMA. 1937;109(16):1276-1279. doi:10.1001/jama.1937.92780420002010
Abstract

This is one of a series of articles written by eminent authorities for the purpose of extending information concerning the official medicines. The twenty-four articles in this series have been planned and developed through the cooperation of the U. S. Pharmacopeial Committee of Revision andThe Journal of the American Medical Association.—Ed.

PHYSIOLOGIC FACTORS  In order to understand the proper use of calcium in medication, it is essential to appreciate the exchange of calcium in the normal body. Most of the inorganic constituents of the body are not stored except in soft tissues, but calcium is stored in vast quantities also in the bones. Bones may be divided physiologically into two parts : the cortex, which is essential for posture, which apparently metabolizes at a fairly constant level; and the fine bone trabeculae, which represent an available storehouse for retention or liberation of calcium salts.1 In

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×