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October 30, 1937

ARTIFICIALLY INDUCED FEVER FOR THE TREATMENT OF GONOCOCCIC INFECTIONS IN THE MALE

Author Affiliations

ROCHESTER, N. Y.

From the Departments of Medicine (Radiology), Surgery (Urology), and Bacteriology of the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry and Strong Memorial and Rochester Municipal Hospitals.

JAMA. 1937;109(18):1430-1435. doi:10.1001/jama.1937.02780440020006
Abstract

With the advance of chemotherapy, numerous drugs have been developed and used for the treatment of gonorrhea with the hope that a preparation might be found which was capable of quickly destroying the gonococcus without injuring the mucous membrane of the male urethra. The inadequacy of chemical treatment, in all probability, has been due to the anatomic structure of the male urethra and to the tendency of the gonococcus to become "fast" to germicides used locally. Search for a specific drug for intravenous use has likewise been disappointing. Comparatively recently, however, two related products, prontosil1 and prontylin (sulfanilamide), have been heralded by a few investigators as specifics for meningococcic and gonococcic infections. While we have been using sulfanilamide in our clinic for some time, we feel that further studies must be made before its clinical value can be definitely determined. Antigonococcus serums, vaccines, filtrates, bacteriophages and the like have

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