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December 25, 1937

THE TRAINING OF THE STUDENT IN WHAT IS INVOLVED IN ADEQUATE MEDICAL CARE

Author Affiliations

SYRACUSE, N. Y.

From Syracuse University College of Medicine.

JAMA. 1937;109(26):2136-2137. doi:10.1001/jama.1937.02780520026006
Abstract

During recent years there has been a feeling on the part of many medical educators that there has developed too great a tendency in the undergraduate curriculum to stress disease rather than the patient suffering from disease.

Although the discontinuance of the preceptorship and the institutionalizing of medical education was an important and necessary development, it did tend to emphasize to the student the details of disease processes and to minimize a consideration of the patient as an individual. Students became inclined to view patients more or less abstractly in terms of specific diseases; e. g., a case of pneumonia or a case of mitral stenosis.

The recent rapid advances in the physical and chemical aspects of medicine with the development of a large number of technical procedures useful in both the diagnosis and the treatment of disease have tended to submerge further a consideration of the patient as an

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