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January 15, 1938

FILTRABLE VIRUSES IN INFECTION OF THE UPPER RESPIRATORY TRACT

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK

From the Department of Medicine, College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University and the Presbyterian Hospital.

JAMA. 1938;110(3):177-180. doi:10.1001/jama.1938.02790030011003
Abstract

In the past ten years a considerable amount of knowledge has accumulated relating to the etiology and the mechanism of infection of the upper respiratory tract. Beginning with the common cold, it has been shown that there exists in this disease a filtrable virus1 which can readily be demonstrated in the secretions of the upper respiratory tract. The evidence for the existence of this virus rests on numerous transmission experiments in which typical acute colds have been produced under conditions of strict quarantine, both in anthropoid apes and in human volunteers, by intranasal inoculation of material derived originally from a human being with an early cold and freed from associated bacteria by filtration. The regularity with which this filtrable virus can be recovered from patients with colds and the failure to demonstrate it in the secretions of normal persons have led to the belief that its role is one

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