[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 174.129.114.211. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
May 28, 1932

LAXATIVE EFFECTS OF WHEAT BRAN AND "WASHED BRAN" IN HEALTHY MENA COMPARATIVE STUDY

Author Affiliations

NEW HAVEN, CONN.

From the Laboratory of Physiological Chemistry, Yale University.

JAMA. 1932;98(22):1866-1875. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02730480016005
Abstract

The importance of ingestion of a reasonable amount of food "roughage" for the maintenance of satisfactory intestinal motility is widely appreciated. It is quite generally recognized that wheat bran contains a relatively large amount of indigestible material, notably cellulose. Knowledge of these facts has resulted in a considerable use by human beings of bran as a source of food roughage. Extreme views regarding such use have been expressed in the literature. Kellogg1 is one of those who attribute numerous ills to constipation and therefore advocate the ingestion of large amounts of various sources of "indigestible residue," including bran, as a corrective and preventive measure. Alvarez2 has challenged this view, and, as evidence for his position, has cited the results of a questionnaire circulated among physicians concerning the therapeutic use of bran. It may be questioned whether such a method of approach to the problem as Alvarez has employed

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×