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March 19, 1938

FEVER OF UNDETERMINED ORIGIN IN A PATIENT WITH TRAUMATIC BRACHIAL ANEURYSM CURED BY EXCISION

Author Affiliations

Chicago

Dr. Kandel is Douglas Smith Fellow, Department of Medicine, University of Chicago Clinics.

JAMA. 1938;110(12):891-892. doi:10.1001/jama.1938.62790120005008b
Abstract

A recent case of traumatic brachial aneurysm presented several interesting features and seems worthy of reporting:

L. M., a white American laborer, aged 24, in the cold and freezing rooms of a Chicago packing company was referred to the Hematology Clinic of the University of Chicago, Oct. 15, 1935, because "abnormal cells" had been seen in blood films. He complained of chills, fever, nausea and vomiting during the last month and a half, a general sick feeling for the last four years, and pain in the right arm for four years. In 1925 he had been shot in the right arm, the 0.22 bullet entering about 4 cm. above the flexor crease on the lateral surface of the biceps brachii tendon and ranging upward. It was removed from the arm two hours later and the wound healed, the patient thought, without any infection. The sole resulting disability was limitation of

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