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April 9, 1938

RATIONAL USE OF ACACIA IN TREATMENT OF THE NEPHROTIC SYNDROME

Author Affiliations

DALLAS, TEXAS

From the Baylor University and Parkland hospitals.

JAMA. 1938;110(15):1173-1176. doi:10.1001/jama.1938.02790150019006
Abstract

The principal fault in the nephrotic syndrome is the loss of protein through damaged glomeruli. The proteins in the blood plasma decrease, so the effective osmotic pressure of the plasma is decreased and an abnormal amount of fluid escapes into the tissue, producing edema. This condition appears only after much of the body protein, such as muscles, has been depleted.1 Hartmann2 in 1933 presented a series of cases of the nephrotic syndrome in children in which he raised the effective osmotic pressure of the plasma by giving large amounts of acacia intravenously and profuse diuresis resulted. Subsequent experience has shown that if a sufficient amount of acacia is given to patients with the syndrome who have no renal insufficiency, diuresis will always occur. The effect unfortunately is only temporary, as the acacia is excreted rapidly (60 per cent in seven days). Obviously one cannot continue to inject acacia

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