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June 18, 1932

SPONTANEOUS HYPOGLYCEMIC SHOCK IN CHILDREN: REPORT OF FOUR CASES

Author Affiliations

Rockville Centre, N. Y.; New York

From the Department of Pediatrics, New York University, and the Children's Medical Service, Bellevue Hospital.

JAMA. 1932;98(25):2198-2199. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.27320510001007
Abstract

During the past three years, four children have been observed with syncope associated with an idiopathic hypoglycemia. Three patients were admitted with complete loss of consciousness, one with semiconsciousness, and all appeared to be extremely sick. The blood sugar values ranged from 27 mg. to 73 mg. per hundred cubic centimeters. Two of the patients recovered immediately after receiving dextrose intravenously, the third after dextrose by mouth and rectum, the fourth recovered spontaneously. None of these patients had convulsions.

In view of the recent reports in the literature of patients with convulsions due to hypoglycemia, it seems desirable to report this group of cases presenting unconsciousness due to hypoglycemia but not convulsions. There is little reference in the pediatric literature to hypoglycemia as a cause of syncope alone.

Seale Harris1 was the first to call attention to the possibility of hyperinsulinism in adults as a cause of spontaneous hypoglycemic

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