August 6, 1932

Modern Treatment Anæsthesia.

JAMA. 1932;99(6):500. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02740580068039

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This book, says the author, was written for the occasional anesthetist, and it will well serve its purpose. Parts of the volume are written with headings and subheadings; and the frequent use of short, imperative expressions makes the information readily accessible. In reading this book one gets, in a general way, a picture of the methods of anesthetization used at Leeds. These methods, and the apparatus employed, are somewhat different from those used in this country. For this reason the book would be more useful to anesthetists in England than to anesthetists in America. The reader must be impressed with the extensive experience of the author, who also has a happy way of expressing himself. This felicity is particularly evident in the chapter on endotracheal methods, in which he writes: "Some practice is required to introduce the tube quickly and correctly without removing pharyngeal divots." Local and regional anesthesia are

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