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Article
August 13, 1932

LONDON

JAMA. 1932;99(7):572-573. doi:10.1001/jama.1932.02740590052022

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Abstract

The Museum of the Royal College of Surgeons  The annual report of the conservator of the museum of the Royal College of Surgeons illustrates anew the dominance of John Hunter in British surgery and the fitness of Sir Arthur Keith for maintaining the hunterian tradition. The museum is the greatest pathologic collection in the world, but it is much more than that. The subject of John Hunter's inquiry was not merely disease but life itself, and it was to elucidate its mechanisms that he made experiments and amassed his collection of specimens, of which the museum is but an expansion. Sir Arthur Keith is the sixth to occupy the position of conservator. Under all its conservators the museum has continued to grow with the advance of knowledge, but one feature has remained constant: the museum today is arranged in the same divisions as in Hunter's time. But each conservator showed

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